Thought Leadership2020-10-21T10:10:27-07:00

News   |   Cases   |   Presentations   |   Firm News  |  Thought Leadership

EEOC Provides Guidance on Assessing the Adverse Impact of Artificial Intelligence in Employment Selection Procedures

The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) recently issued guidance regarding the use of software, algorithms and artificial intelligence (AI) in employers’ “selection procedures,” in other words, employment decisions related to hiring, promotion and firing. Learn more from RPLG Senior Counsel Spencer Wilson and Associate Anastasia Bondarchuk.

2023 Renne Public Law Group Public Law Fellowship Fosters Collaboration and Career Growth

On June 5, our 2023 class of Renne Public Law Group (RPLG) fellows completed their public law programming, which encompassed 10 days of engaging speaker sessions, research projects and valuable mentorship opportunities. 

Pregnant Workers Fairness Act Expands Protections

Beginning June 27, 2023, the Pregnant Workers Fairness Act (PWFA) expands protections for pregnant employees and job applicants. The PWFA is a new federal law that requires private and public sector employers with at least 15 employees to provide “reasonable accommodations” to known limitations related to qualified employees’ and job applicants’ pregnancy, childbirth, or related medical conditions, unless the employer can demonstrate that the accommodation would impose an undue hardship on business operations.

California Supreme Court Limits Governmental Immunity Statute That California Courts of Appeal Had Read More Broadly

The California Supreme Court recently rejected the Court of Appeal’s broad reading of Government Code section 821.6, which shields public employees acting within the scope of their employment from liability for “instituting or prosecuting any judicial or administrative proceeding” even if the action is “malicious and without probable cause.” The purpose of the statute is to protect public officials from malicious prosecution actions, but the plain language is broad enough to cover other types of tortious conduct.

Court of Appeal Upholds One-Term Limit and Salary Cap for County Supervisors

In San Bernardino County Board of Supervisors v. Monell (2023) 91 Cal.App.5th 1248, the Court of Appeal upheld a voter initiative setting an unprecedented one-term limit and significant salary reduction for the San Bernardino County Board of Supervisors. While courts have generally upheld term limits, this case tests the outer bounds of such laws. 

Supreme Court Holds Parents Deprived Of Reunification Services Not Entitled to Automatic Relief

In Michael G. v. Superior Court, the California Supreme Court (Kruger, J.) considered whether a juvenile court must automatically order the county to provide services beyond 18 months if it finds that the agency failed to provide reasonable services (here, between the 12- to 18-month extension period).  The Court held that the parent is not entitled to an automatic extension of services.

Chalking It Up to Nothing: The Ninth Circuit Upholds San Diego’s Chalking Practice Under the Special Needs Exception to the Warrant Requirement

Municipalities in California that rely on the practice of chalking tires to enforce parking restrictions can take solace in a recent Ninth Circuit decision that affirms the constitutionality of the practice and parts ways with Sixth Circuit precedent that had previously raised constitutional questions about

FPPC Guidance on New Campaign Contribution Restriction for Local Elected Officials

At its November meeting, the Fair Political Practices Commission (“FPPC”) voted not to apply SB 1439 to campaign contributions received in 2022, prior to SB 1439’s effective date. Recently enacted by the Legislature, SB 1439 sets new limits on campaign contributions solicited or received by local elected officials.

Go to Top